Disputatio:Vermis

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Vermis ~ vermiculus?[fontem recensere]

I wrote this article originally as Vermiculus, to tie in with the noun vermiculus in Tangaloa (where the entities in question are maggots), but then it became clear that the English original was covering too many animals, so I changed it to Vermis. Was/Is there in Latin a well-accepted differentiation between these terms? or were/are they used interchangeably? For the sake of clarity, unless attested usage argues otherwise, I suggest differentiating between vermes (as "true" worms, in some strict, technically definable sense) and vermiculi (wormlike stages of insects, known in English as caterpillars, grubs, larvae, and maggots). IacobusAmor 19:36, 8 Martii 2009 (UTC)


Sorry, I couldn't help but create the article. Please feel free to change.Jondel (disputatio) 11:00, 19 Martii 2013 (UTC)

Commentarius prior[fontem recensere]

Now I find that Vicipaedia already had an article on this subject, a hiccup of a stub entitled wrongly in the plural: Vermes (which is why I didn't find it earlier). Its lemma is defined as "nomen pluribus commune animantibus," with its entire remaining text being "Habent corpora producta, tenera et ossium experta. Inter ceteros vermes appellantur lumbrici et annelida." What to do? I'll mark the short text for deletion, and more-experienced contributors can suggest how to improve the situation. IacobusAmor 19:36, 8 Martii 2009 (UTC)

You are fairly experienced :) The right thing is to merge the articles (i.e. to ensure that any sensible info and any useful picture in the poorer article is included in the better one, and then to make the poorer article into a redirect). You are the ideal person to do this, because you have just written the good article so you know best if anything needs to be included. If not, just be bold and make Vermes a redirect to Vermis. Andrew Dalby (disputatio) 19:59, 8 Martii 2009 (UTC)
I might if I knew how. The picture is already in the bigger version (Vermis). The smaller version's only concept not in the bigger version is that the bodies of worms are 'experienced at/in bones' (ossium experta), whatever that means! IacobusAmor 20:50, 8 Martii 2009 (UTC)
Ah, it's trying to say 'boneless.' But wouldn't that be ossium expertia? IacobusAmor 20:55, 8 Martii 2009 (UTC)