Disputatio:Placita Marxiana

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Naming of Placita Marxiana[fontem recensere]

Would someone care to explain it to me? Aliquis aperui iuvi lemma, Cur "Placita Marxiana" non "Marxismus"? Bandit V. 09:33, 8 Iunii 2009 (CST)

Placita Marxiana = the marxist pleas = marxist politcal platform. In my opinion, this article should be centered about the philosophy rather than the political platform, but articles on both are good.--Rafaelgarcia 15:12, 8 Iunii 2009 (UTC)
Secundum Cassell's: placita (n. pl.) = 'opinions, teaching'. Ergo, placita Marxiana = 'Marxist opinions, Marx's teaching'. IacobusAmor 15:19, 8 Iunii 2009 (UTC)
Isn't opinon=sententia and teaching=doctrina? True, though L&S do give down on the page placeo:
Subst.: plăcĭtum, i, n.
  a Prop., that which is pleasing or agreeable: ultra placitum laudare, more than is agreeable, Verg. E. 7, 27. —
  b Transf.    (a)    An opinion, sentiment (post-Aug.): Catonis placita de olivis, Plin. 15, 5, 6, § 20. —    
(b)    A determination, prescription, order: medicorum placita, Plin. 14, 22, 28, § 143. —    
(g)    A maxim, principle: ipse (Rubellius) placita majorum colebat, Tac. A. 14, 22: sapientium placita, 
id. ib. 16, 19: Stoicorum, id. H. 3, 81: philosophorum, id. Or. 19: nec est quare hoc inter nostra placita mireris, 
Sen. Ep. 66, 45: decreta, quae Graeci vocant dogmata, nobis vel decreta licet adpellare vel scita vel placita, 
Sen. Ep. 95, 10: philosophiae placita, id. ib. § 37: Babyloniorum,  Plin. 2, 79, 81, § 191; Col. 9, 2, 1.
Partially supporting your meaning (b) and (g) from L&S above "A determination, prescription, order" and "decreta, quae Graeci vocant dogmata, nobis vel decreta licet adpellare vel scita vel placita, Sen. Ep. 95, 10" and "A maxim, principle: ipse (Rubellius) placita majorum colebat, Tac. A. 14, 22: sapientium placita, id. ib. 16, 19: Stoicorum, id. H. 3, 81: philosophorum, id. Or. 19:"
However, we should then translate using the genitive "placita marxistarum"="marxist principles/decrees"
The first meaning (a) "Prop., that which is pleasing or agreeable", however, implies "placita marxiana"="Those agreeable Marxist things/opinions", which would be POV. I'm not at all convinced that placita marxiana is at all the best term for marxism, except to someone who believes in it and finds it agreeable.
On the other hand, there is the medieval term "placitum, placiti N (2nd) N [FLXFJ] Medieval veryrare plea;" given by Words, which what I thought was being said, and is apparently derived from meaning (b).
In sum, I'n not sure it's a better term than Marxismus.--Rafaelgarcia 15:45, 8 Iunii 2009 (UTC)
Or perhaps agreeable here refers to opinions held in common by marxists, or which are pleasing to them.--Rafaelgarcia 15:49, 8 Iunii 2009 (UTC)
Whatever the case with most of your interesting points, which I don't have time to go through carefully, having just returned from a trip to Boston (during which I waved in your direction as I drove by), I take Marxiana as meaning 'of Marx', not 'of Marxists'. Vide Beethoveniana ([1]), Harvardiana 'things of Harvard' (and see en:Harvardiana), Shakespeariana ([2]), Shaviana ([3]), etc. IacobusAmor 16:25, 8 Iunii 2009 (UTC)
I read the title as pleasing Marxist ideas...?I used the WORD dictionary for this one, I think my paperback two might have helped also, but wouldn't Marxismus be a title that wouldn't have a connotation either for or against Marxists? Also, is Cassell's the standard dictionary? I have the Chambers Murray Latin to English and the New College Latin to English and English to Latin...is that a potential problem? Bandit V. 11:12, 8 Iunii 2009 (CST)
Use whatever dictionaries you have. Every dictionary has strengths & weaknesses. Cassell's favors classical usage and ignores terms & senses that came into vogue after the second century of the Common Era. IacobusAmor
Thank you, I used Cassell's for quite some time while borrowing it. I always wondered if it made a difference. Now I know. Bandit V.